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Beef, largest single segment

Agfact Day #30

Cattle and beef production represent the largest single segment of American agriculture. In fact according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) more farms are classified as beef cattle operations (31%) than any other type of farm. Grant most cattle operation are small, 90% of cow herds are less than 100 with average about 44 animals.

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In 2011, 742,000 herds of cattle (farms) existed in the United States, the home of 30.9 million  beef cows and 26.7 million feeder calves.

 

 
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Posted by on November 30, 2012 in Ag Facts

 

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Shrinking Carbon Footprint of Beef

Agfact Day #26:  

The carbon footprint of beef was reduced by more than 16% from 1977 to 2007. U.S. cattlemen raise 20% of the world’s beef with 7% of the world’s cattle, making the United States a leader in raising sustainable beef.

 
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Posted by on November 26, 2012 in Ag Facts

 

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Beef, More Bang for the Buck

Agfact #24 

Meat is a great source of high-quality protein that no single vegetarian food can provide. A 3-ounce serving of lean beef offers the most protein with the fewest calories when compared to plant proteins such as peanut butter, black beans and tofu.

  • A 3-ounce serving of lean beef is about 180 calories. You would have to eat 670 calories of peanut butter (more than 7 tablespoons) to get the same amount of protein.
  • A person would need to consume two to three times the calories provided in a 3-ounce serving of beef to get an equivalent amount of protein from a veggie burger.
  • The USDA has approved 29 cuts of lean beef. All lean beef cuts have less than 10 grams of total fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3½-oz serving.
 
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Posted by on November 24, 2012 in Ag Facts

 

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Certified Angus Beef, Breaking Sale Records

AgFacts #15

About 2.2 million pounds of Certified Angus Beef®  are sold daily, generating an estimated $4 billion in consumer sales annually. In 2012, 811 million pounds of Certified Angus Beef® brand products were sold at distinguished establishments around the world. Nearly 14,000 licensed retail and foodservice partners in the United States and 45 other countries offer the premium brand.

  • The Certified Angus Beef ® brand is a cut above USDA Prime, Choice and Select. Ten quality standards ensure every bit is flavorful, tender and juicy.
  • Only 1 in 4 Angus cattle meets the highest standards to become the Certified Angus Beef ® brand, making it Angus beef at its best®.
  •  Every pound of beef is tracked from initial identification until it is sold to consumers, ensuring genuine Certified Angus Beef ® brand products
  • The same independent USDA graders inspect black-hided cattle (typical of the Angus breed) and give it a grade. All beef considered for the brand must be the best Choice, or Prime, beef – truly the top of the scale. This top-quality Angus beef is then evaluated again, using the brand’s set of 10 science-based specifications for marbling, size and uniformity. If it’s good enough to make the cut, then it earns the distinctive Certified Angus Beef ® brand label.

Certified Angus Beef Fact Sheet

10 Quality Standards of Certified Angus Beef

Go Rare 

 
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Posted by on November 15, 2012 in Ag Facts

 

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Cow Sugar

AgFact Day #9:        Black Angus Cattle have gray-rough tongues.

Purebred Angus Cow

Many people who visit our beef farm are surprised to learn that the color of the tongue of our purebred Angus Cattle are grey.  The tongue surface is also very rough.

I do not recommend that you get as close as my daughter to examine a cow’s tongue. Remember this is a cow she owns and works with every day.  They have earned each other’s trust.

 
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Posted by on November 9, 2012 in Ag Facts

 

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Protecting the Land

AgFact Day#3

The same land that provides food and open space for raising cattle also offers a home for many types of wildlife, including threatened and endangered species of fish, mammals, birds and plants.

http://www.explorebeef.org

 
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Posted by on November 3, 2012 in Ag Facts

 

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Warm Spring Weather Sprouts Bad roots @ Beef | AGWEB.com

Over the last few weeks, I have been inundated with media furry and junky science filling the minds of consumer with myths about Beef.  I cannot help to wonder:


 

meatsales

Fill the Media w/Misinformation @ Beef =

Loss of Valuable Nutritional Source to your Diet

So before you swear off that juicy hamburger, get the facts from this Mom and Beef Producer:

 Pink Slime Myth

Last week ABC news aired a story about “Pink Slime” used in ground beef sold at supermarket. The term “Pink Slime” paints an unwelcoming image that frankly could make one lose his or her appetite. A goal of the anti-meat crusades? In fact, here is a image floating around the Online World:

 

Perhaps, you may have read that “Pink Slime” is meat trimmings scooped off the floor of packing plants or it is “filler” that is unsafe for consumption.

Fact

Pink Slime is a term coined by the anti-meat campaign.  The fact is “Pink Slime” is Lean Finely Textured Beef (LFTB) and actually looks like this:

 Boneless Lean Beef Trimmings (So called "Pink Sime")

As cuts of beef-roast or steak- are prepared for the meat case, the lean meat is separated from fat trimmings. Food handling facilities utilize every portion of the beef animal. The process of separating fat from the lean meat yields 10-12 pounds of lean, nutritionous beef that is inspected by United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

The facts are clear on Food Product Labels:


Dr. H. Russell Cross, Professor and Animal Science Department Head of Texas A & M University, was the administrator of the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service when LFTB was approved.

 “As Administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) in the early 90s, I and my staff evaluated numerous research projects before approving lean, finely textured beef as a safe source of high-quality protein. The FSIS safety review process was and is an in-depth, science-based process that spans years, many research projects and involves many experts across all levels of the agency-and in this case, the process proved the product is safe.”

 Dr. Cross talks about the safety of LFTB

Simply put from this Beef farmer, Lean Finely Textured Beef is 100% USDA Inspected Beef.  It will not appear as a separate ingredient on your Ground Beef label because it is BEEF not an chemical-engineered additive as presented in the media.

Harvard Study on Red Meat

This week, the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) release a study claiming red meat consumption causes “premature death”.  Without missing a beat, the media began reporting the findings of the study after it was published online in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The study tested more than 37,000 men and 38,000 women through surveys and questionaires.

“Our study adds more evidence to the health risks of eating high amounts of red meat, which has been associated with type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, and certain cancers in other studies,” said lead author An Pan, research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at HSPH.

On the surface this statement grabs your attention and makes you rethink the hamburger. However as a person who cooks the majority of the meals in the family, it is important to take an in-depth behind the study look.

This Harvard Study asked 37,000 men and 38,000 women through a questionaire every four years and documented deaths of the group during the twenty year period.  No lab work completed; no Research 101testing -just a simple question and answer scenerio.  As Dr. Shalene McNeill, a licensed dietician, points out this is an “observation study” where a cause/effect relationship cannot be established.

Editoral Director Adam Bornstein form Livestrong.com (Lance Armstrong) agrees:

“How did the researchers test the dangers of meat? Through a survey and questionnaire. This wasn’t some deep and complex lab work.

As for the ability to demonstrate a cause and effect relationship between red meat and mortality? Those claims are impossible. Always remember Research 101: Correlation does not equal causation. Often, it’s merely guilt by association.”

 Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/blog/are-burgers-healthy-why-red-meat-is-not-bad-for-you/#ixzz1pIeTfyYk

An observation study without randomize controlled trial is just a published thought.  I make dietary choices based on facts not studies that waste valuable resources.

 Facts

As I published in my previous blog post, a randomized controlled clinical study by Pennsylvania State University conlcuded participants following a BOLD (Beef in Optimal Lean Diet) and BOLD-PLUS diet experienced a 10 perent decrease in LDL Cholesterol.

Remember 3 ounces serving of lean beef contains approximately 150 calories packed with essential nutrients:  protein, zinc, vitamin B12,  vitamin B6, niacin, selenium,phossphorus, choline, iron, and riboflavin.

Learn More at BeefNutrition.Org

So fire up the grill and select one of the 20 lean cuts of beef.  Remember, a healthy lifestyle is about portion control, a balanced diet, and exercise.

Warm Spring Weather Sprouts Bad roots @ Beef | AGWEB.com.

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2012 in Myths @ Ag

 

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